3D printers encounter serious security flaws

Researchers at the University of California, Irvine (UCI) (United States) said that, just by simply record the noises emanating from a machine operating information, hackers can reverse design the object being produced.

Recently, we constantly say that 3D printing technology will change the world, and it’s easy for us to believe it. This technology has created an opportunity for great things to be done on the spot, since the braces until the body parts and even the world’s lightest material.

However, a new discovery has revealed a fundamental security flaw in the current 3D printer. Researchers at the University of California, Irvine (UCI) (United States) said that, just by simply record the noises emanating from a machine operating information, hackers can reverse design of the the object being produced….

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Understand that you simply listen to the noises of the 3D printer to detect and track the movement of the printer nozzle. Then you can use the logs to reverse and find the design of the product.

In other words, you can steal the intellectual property of any 3D printer, just by putting a device such as a smartphone or tape recorder next to a 3D printer.

For things that are open source, such as a small statue, the trinkets are openly shared on the internet, this is not a problem. But with the other product design, things can not be shared, the mere sound of a 3D printer may be causing them to be released.

Professor Mohammad Al Faruque, who led the research team, said: “If the process and product information stolen in the concept phase, the company will be at risk of significant financial losses”.

The team said they had accidentally discovered security vulnerabilities when testing physical properties of 3D printers, to find out the relationship between information and energy flow. The distinctive sounds of 3D printers is not merely the noise.

“According to the basic laws of physics, energy is not lost, but it is converted from one form to another, for example from power into kinetic energy,” said Al Faruque. “Some forms of energy are converted using a useful and meaningful, some may inadvertently disclose confidential information”.

In the case of 3D printers, the source code is called G-code – encrypted, theoretically, we can not access the information on its design. However, Al Faruque and his team have discovered a security hole in which the source code can be revealed through sound, and can fully recorded.

Their findings – to be presented next week at the International Conference on physical systems – Cyber ​​Vienna (Austria) – is described in detail on how they approach the noise to re-design objects in 3D with an accuracy of up to 90%.

This vulnerability could cause the intellectual property rights of many 3D printed products can not be guaranteed and many who will take advantage of to engage in industrial espionage.

“Initially, we were not interested in the security timber corners, but we realize that it’s really important, and we’re seeing interest from all departments at UCI and from other agencies the US government, “said Al Faruque.

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